The Geisler-Licona Controversy

Several months ago (if not a little longer) a controversy was sparked by a criticism made by Norman Geisler against Mike Licona concerning a particular interpretation of Matthew 27:52-53 Licona advocated in his book The Resurrection of Jesus. For a survey of the controversy see the Christianity Today article here. In a nutshell Geisler accused Licona of denying inerrancy by virtue of his interpretation. Most recently Licona read a paper at the ETS conference where he defended his position (although he has modified it a bit since the release of the book). Geisler has, of course, responded to the paper which you can find here. This controversy reminded me of the ordeal that Geisler had with Murray Harris years ago over Harris’ view of the resurrection of Jesus. (See here for a paper by Gary Habermas on the subject.) The YouTube clip below features the thoughts of Paul Copan on the subject.

 

 

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3 thoughts on “The Geisler-Licona Controversy

  1. Pingback: More on the Geisler/Licona Kerfuffle | Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth

  2. Wow; I’ve heard the word “apocalyptic” used as a rationale for not taking prophecy seriously, but never before as a reason for not taking an historical narrative seriously.

  3. Mr. Licona’s position is quite wrong. 1 Cor. 13 (KJV) tells us that if we love someone we believe all things thus if a believer loves Jesus and God they will believe His words. The passage of scripture in question at the center of this feud is quite clear and does not have Matthew using some ancient secular historian’s trick but rather shows him REPORTING what actually took place at the time when Jesus gave up His spirit.

    Why God did it we do not know. How it applies to today is simple, we learn something about the other events that took place in conjunction with Jesus’ crucifixion and we see God impressing upon people exactly WHO JESUS IS.

    Those who declare that it did not happen now call God a liar and sin.

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